Life is therapy too…

I’d love to be that kind of mum you see online, who has shelves full of interesting things that enliven and inspire their kids….but I’m not. I gaze wistfully at photographs of clean children engaging with wide-eyed wonderment at the quaint, colour coordinated activities devised by their talented mothers. I have evil fantasies of the 1,647 other photos taken before they FINALLY got one that looks like the kid is…

a) actually using the activity and
b) enjoying themselves.
(Yes, I’m spiteful like that…)

Sensory buckets, cloud dough, button snakes, flash cards…..I’ve seen them all. I keep trying them every now and then but Wade just isn’t into structured games (that are my idea…)

Setting up an ‘invitation to play’ in our house is an invitation to walk right past it and play with the dog instead.

A sensory bucket would only evoke the sense of me swearing under my breath as I pick a thousand tiny pieces of lavender scented crap off the floor after Wade pushes it off the table and wanders off to see if there is an unattended butcher’s knife within arm’s reach on the bench.

Normally I wouldn’t care, but raising a child with developmental delay means I am an expert in Mother Guilt. The minute Wade was born, a small portion of my brain was set aside, devoted entirely to being preoccupied with ‘Therapy’. I can’t avoid it…it’s built in. The fact is, we know that kids with Down syndrome benefit enormously from regular physio, OT and speech therapy. We know that when we teach our kids things they learn and the earlier we start, the better the results. I know that with persistence, consistency and patience, Wade will develop all the skills he needs to be an independent, functioning member of society….it just takes more time.

It’s a common complaint from parents of a child with extra needs….they don’t feel as though they are getting enough therapy for their child. Either there are not enough services available or there never seems to be enough hours in the day to rush between physio appointments or speechie sessions especially if their child has extra health issues that mean doctors appointments as well. I used to send myself crazy worrying whether I was doing enough for Wade but I have come to a bit of a realisation. Continue reading

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What did I expect?

I’ve kind of missed the boat recently on some of the controversies swirling around in the media relating to Down syndrome. There has been no shortage of blogger fodder for me to sink my teeth into but we have been away on holidays and I haven’t been in the right frame of mind to weigh in heavily on the issues. I tried writing bits and pieces here and there but between intermittent wifi and holiday distractions I couldn’t get going. I did read the hoopla surrounding the comments made by Richard Dawkins and managed to fire off this tweet….

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……but as I was trying to craft an intelligent and witty rebuttal to one of the biggest clangers a man of his intelligence could make, it dawned on me…. I was waaaay too busy having fun hanging out in New Zealand as a family, catching up with relatives, going on road trips, kayaking, sight seeing and sledding in the snow. You know….doing all the things that apparently shouldn’t be possible if we let ourselves be swayed by the opinions of people who have no idea what they are talking about. (In fact, according to Dawkins, I should have spared myself the “suffering” of this wonderful holiday and would have been much happier if I hadn’t been so “immoral” as to have given birth to Wade 2 and a half years ago. Gah!)

There have been so many things I wanted to expand on about these kinds of attitudes but the one concept I keep returning to is that of low expectations. The idea being that the biggest hurdle facing people with Down syndrome is the low expectations society has about them. Continue reading

What do we Lose if we “Cure” Down Syndrome?

Yesterday morning I heard something that really made my blood boil for the first time since Wade was born. I got into the car to hear a local celebrity scientist on the radio discussing an item from the day’s news. Recent research has developed a technique for potentially shutting down the extra chromosome in the cells of a person with Down syndrome. The short term implication is the potential to develop new gene therapies to treat some of the health issues more commonly associated with DS such as hypothyroidism, leukaemia and early onset Alzheimer’s. The wider implication is that this technique may be used to ultimately turn off DS in the embryonic stage effectively “curing” it.

It wasn’t this in itself that made me angry, it was the description this scientist gave of Down syndrome. She called it a “devastating” condition. There was joy in her voice as she described how this discovery had the potential to eradicate DS all together. And I thought to myself…this is my son they are talking about here. Maybe I’m just an over protective mother ready to leap to the defence of my child (well, I was when I fired off my aggrieved text message into the station!!) but it also had me thinking about what is really at stake here.

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Continue reading

Milestone Junkie

As with every other aspect of my parenting story so far, Wade’s developmental delay has me swinging wildly from graciously understanding the reasons why everything takes longer to learn, to tearing my hair out over why he can do some things easily and not others.

Kids with Down Syndrome are usually characterised by some degree of developmental delay. When they are older, this is usually known as an Intellectual Disability. The reason for this is an Intellectual Disability is a specific, clinical term that is determined by an IQ test. When children are not old enough to be formally assessed this way, they are known to have developmental delay. Developmental delay means that our children can learn and can develop along the usual trajectory but everything takes longer to learn and often requires some specialist help along the way. This usually affects all aspect of development including the physical, the cognitive and the intellectual.

Before Wade was born, I remember being shocked at the approximate ages that children with DS achieve physical milestones. I couldn’t imagine a 9 month old unable to sit up or a 2-3year old unable to walk. It completely floored me. Like a lot of things I read during that time, this kind of information is general and each child develops completely differently. Wade, for example, came out of the gates racing. His gross motor skills were quite good. He has low muscle tone but he was quite strong and active. I would put him on his back and he would kick his legs about and wave his arms. It didn’t take that long for him to lift his head during tummy time and other DS parents and medical specialists were very encouraging about how well he was doing early on. This is when you get your first taste of that tempting, intoxicating parenting drug….praise. You get a high, you feel fantastic. Nothing gets better than this. Continue reading

The Cynic V The Anxious Wreck: a war story

From the day Wade was born, I have been waging an internal war about how to manage the competing feelings of wanting to do the best for him, yet not wanting to get sucked in to the heaving pile of guilt-laden extra “stuff” that society makes you feel utterly compelled to do for your child, whether they need it or not.

In the past, I have struggled with anxiety. Snowballing worries and being paralysed by indecision usually topped the list of how it manifested. The great paradoxical irony being that, before I met Mick and had Wade, the consequences of bad decisions were fairly minimal but the anxiety levels were pretty high. There was only me to worry about yet I found it extremely hard to move forward when there was no clear path or there were too many pros and cons to manage. Now, even though there is much more at stake, I find it much easier to manage the anxiety and make clear decisions. The turning point for me came well before Wade though, at the police academy, where I learned that when faced with an unfamiliar situation, you have to make a decision and do SOMETHING. Walking away is not an option because when you are standing there in the blue uniform, everyone is looking to you to fix the problem and even though you might not know the absolute best course of action to take, you have to back yourself and pick one.

It was the greatest lesson I ever learned. Continue reading